Le Bone Marché

Le Bon Marché is the world's first department store. Now the property of LVMH, it sells a wide range of high-end goods, including food.

PROBLEM

  • They needed to create a multi-brand department store that accurately represented their incredible in-store experience online.
  • Because of their close relationship with LVMH, they have an opportunity to showcase brands and products that aren't available anywhere else online.
  • Provide a high level of service that could also potentially integrate with their offline store.

GOALS

After analysing what the problems were, we had a clear outline as to what the user and business goals should be.

  • Showcase hero brands in a unique and incredibly engaging way.
  • Build a tiered service portal that could identify high value customers and provide them with superior service.

COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS - BRAND EXPERIENCES

It was now time to see who else was trying to achieve the same goals and how they went about it.

The first step was to see how other online department stores were showcasing brands throughout their platforms. Surprisingly, there was little and in some cases none at all. This was clearly an opportunity to innovate in this area and stand out among the competition.

OTHER INSPIRATION

It was clear the competition weren't doing much in regards to showcasing hero brands beyond basic SEO optimisation.

We decided to look at other industries to see how they showcase hero brands or profiles for inspiration.

Looking outside of the direct competitors, we were instantly more inspired and could clearly see how we could go about showcasing brands in innovative ways within our vertical.

SKETCHES AND WIREFRAMING

From here we could start sketching and iterating fast. We came up with a variety of solutions that included dedicated, content rich brand pages and also displaying how we could showcase certain brands throughout other parts of the site.

These were some of the initial ideas we had to showcase hero brands in unique and engaging ways. We had access to very high quality brand content, so we thought we should create pages that take advantage of that.

Unlike our direct competitors, the solution we put forward was very content heavy, visual, yet still incredibly user friendly. While we wanted to showcase beautiful content from hero brands, we made sure shoppers could quickly understand and access core shopping features.

SERVICE

It was important for the retailer to provide a service portal for their customers and potentially create a tiered system that identified and rewarded high value customers. 

We came up with the 'Club LBM' that did just that.

 

TOOLS

I used Sketch to do the wireframing / annotations and Invision to do the prototyping.

The Publishers

www.thepublishers.com

I started The Publishers in 2015 as a network for the world’s leading blogs, publications, journalists and influencers.

PROBLEM

For brands / agencies

  • The publishing industry is becoming increasingly fragmented making it harder to discover relevant influencers.
  • Once there were a few major magazines, now there are hundreds of thousands of people with more influence than those magazines.

For publishers

  • Ad-blocking software is increasingly becoming a threat to their business. More on that here.
  • They struggle to be discovered. Particularly the long tail who have respectable numbers.

PUBLISHERS / AGENCY GOALS

After analysing what the problems were, we had a clear outline as to what the user and business goals should be.

Publisher goals

  • Be discovered by relevant agencies / brands
  • Sell sponsored posts in a seamless and safe way

Business goals

  • Discover relevant publishers
  • By sponsored posts in a seamless and safe way

COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS

It was now time to see who else was trying to achieve the same goals and how they went about it.

This was a mixture of interviewing publishers and brands to see how they went about things. I did this with a questionnaire and talking with them face-to-face.

VISION STATEMENT

I needed a vision statement I could always refer to when things got a little hairy. This statement was constantly used to keep me on track and motivated.

To be the central hub for the world’s publishing industry

This was an ambitious vision statement that was focused enough to keep me on track.

CONTENT STRATEGY

The content strategy was best developed by being very clear what The Publishers was not. It was not a news reader, it was not a consumer product. It needed to provide in-depth content for agencies and brands. The information needed to be up-to-date and comprehensive.

CARD SORT

Once we had an idea of our content strategy, it was time for a card sort to see where things belonged. 

SITEMAP

The sitemap was crucial to keeping us organised and knowing what pages were required and what was missing.

HAND-DRAWN SKETCHES

I was hesitant to do hand-drawn sketches as I knew what I wanted and was eager to jump into computer drawn wireframes. 

I managed to resist the temptation and I’m thankful for it. I did more variations on the designs than I expected and was able to iterate much faster as a result.

WIREFRAMES

Once I learned a bunch of lessons from our hand-drawn sketches, it was time to draw them in Sketch and prototype in Marvel.

USER FLOWS

Some flows needed user flows. The most important one to outline for the developers was the add profile flow. Initially, I didn’t do a user flow for this. They got a few things wrong and it wasn’t until I did the flow that they were able to complete the project properly. 

I should’ve done this from the start.

PROTOTYPING & ANNOTATION

I used Marvel to finish the prototypes and the annotations were done in Sketch. 

Overall, the feedback from the developers was extremely positive and the development was fairly seamless.

RESULTS

The product is being rolled out slowly at the moment. I’m currently doing live user testing to iterate and improve further.

You can see it here www.thepublishers.com

NUJI - iPhone app

 

www.nuji.com

I started Nuji with two other people as a web first lifestyle and fashion shopping business in 2010. Between 2010 and 2014, we saw a rapid shift towards mobile. More than 50% of our customers were mobile shoppers by 2014 and this seemed to be increasing.

We dug a little further and found that 90% of our mobile customers were iPhone users.

Our website wasn’t mobile optimised. We decided to try the site out as a mobile only user and found the experience incredibly frustrating.

It was crystal clear that we needed to improve our website for mobile users and create a native iPhone app.

PROBLEM

Before diving in, we wanted to understand the problem more. This meant starting with Google Analytics to understand how our customers were using the website with their mobile device.

We discovered that mobile customers were on the site 30% longer than desktop customers. Was this because they preferred to shop in a more personal way on their mobile device, or was this because tasks took 30% longer?

We also discovered that our purchase conversion rates were significantly lower than desktop customers. Was this because they weren’t comfortable purchasing on their mobile devices or was their something wrong with the experience we were providing?

These were just a couple of questions we had after analysing our data. We decided it was time to interview some of our customers to try to understand the data further.

This was a mixture of questionnaires and face-to-face interviews. 

USER / BUSINESS GOALS

After analysing what the problems were, we had a clear outline as to what the user and business goals should be.

User goals

  • The ability to search and compare prices while in store
  • The ability to browse on mobile and save for later to buy on desktop

Business goals

  • Encourage discovery and browsing on mobile, while converting into sales on desktop
  • Encourage users to browse in-store and buy with us online

COMPETITIVE ANALYSIS

Now that our goals were crystal clear, it was time to see who else had the same goals and how they went about achieving them. 

Because this was an app, the best destination was the app store reviews. It was a gold mine to see where our competition was going right and wrong.

From here we could create a matrix of the things we should build and avoid.

VISION STATEMENT

It was now time to solidify our vision statement and make sure the whole team was completely on-board with it. We needed something we could rally towards.

A department store in your pocket

This vision statement expressed how ambitious we were with this project. It was something the whole team could get excited about and understand very clearly.

CONTENT STRATEGY

It was now time to figure out what sort of content we’d have in this app. Would it have editorial? What form would it be in? Images? Text? A mixture of the two? How much information do we show about each product?

CARD SORT

Once we had an idea of our content strategy, it was time for a card sort to see where things belonged. 

SITEMAP

The sitemap was crucial to keeping us organised and knowing what pages were required and what was missing.

HAND-DRAWN SKETCHES

From here we could experiment with some quick and not so pretty sketches. It was time to put some ideas down on paper and talk about them as a team.

This was a very iterative process of drawing, feedback and draw again until we were happy with the direction we were heading in.

We then uploaded these drawings into Keynote and prototyped them. We gave them to friends and customers to test.

WIREFRAMES

Once we learned a bunch of lessons from our hand-drawn sketches, it was time to draw them in Axure. 

USER FLOWS

When all of the wireframes were done, it was clear we needed to draw some of the core user flows to help the rest of the team understand how they worked.

PROTOTYPING & ANNOTATION

We used Keynote to prototype the final project and do extensive testing. This prototype was crucial for the final development of the project. 

In addition to the prototyping, I provided a fully annotated document.

As a result, the development was extremely efficient and faster than any of us expected. 

RESULTS

The app has nearly all 5 star reviews.